Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid #BookReview

TITLE: Daisy Jones and the Six | AUTHOR: Taylor Jenkins Reid| PUBLISHER: Doubleday| PUBLISHED ON: March 5, 2019 | PAGES: 355| RATING: 2 hooks out of 5 | SOURCE: Self-purchased

My Thoughts:

Ugh. What a disappointing read! It’s been a long time since I’ve felt this let down by a book. I’m sure all of the hype around this novel didn’t help, but after reading (and absolutely loving!) The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo last month, I thought the hype would be warranted. Unfortunately, for me, that wasn’t the case.

I know a lot of people who disliked this novel felt like they couldn’t connect with it because of the interview format. That wasn’t an issue for me at all. In fact, the format was probably one of my favorite parts of this novel. I enjoy reading nonfiction about music and musicians, and I think the oral history format is definitely one of the defining trends of that subgenre, so to me this felt like a great fit for the story of this huge 70s rock band. It also lent itself well to having just slightly unreliable narrators, which I thought was well done.

Where my issues lie are largely with the characters. I just did not care at all about any of these people. Daisy least of all. I was expecting this grand, over-the-top, larger than life personality from Daisy, and what I got was a petulant, drug-addled girl with very little personality to speak of. The rest of the band really weren’t much better. Karen was by far the most interesting of the bunch, but even then that isn’t saying a ton. I could sympathize with Billy, to a point, and I enjoyed his relationship with Camila, but the other characters were more or less complete throw-aways for me. Just a bunch of whiny strung out assholes being assholes to each other.

The entire second half of the book felt like one emotionally manipulative ploy after another against the reader. There were so many “twists” and “controversies” near the end of the book, but I didn’t care about any of them because it just felt like a cheap way to force the reader to invest in these characters that, to this point, I could not give a shit about. And then the ending itself was so, so, so bad. I won’t spoil it here, obviously, but the ending was just such a cop-out. I rolled my eyes so hard it physically hurt me.

The premise for this book had so much potential, and the author clearly has the chops to handle it, but this book fell so flat for me. I really couldn’t bring myself to care about any of the characters or events taking place, regardless of how good the prose itself was. There are some great one-liners in this book, but that’s certainly not enough to carry an entire novel. Sex and drugs and rock n’ roll should never be boring, and yet in this book, it’s dull as dirt.